New Order Form With Scanning Preferences

Alright, you asked for it, we listened carefully and here you’ve got it!

For all those customers who have a specific look in mind for their scans we created a new Order Form where you can select color, brightness and contrast preferences.

 

Photography (and particularly color) can be really subjective. We always scan neutral unless you guys give us other specific indications on the COMMENTS area on the Order Form.

 

This has worked totally fine to this day and we’ve always been super open about you asking for “customized” scans and never charging extra for them. But still, we wanted to take an extra step by making the process as easy as possible. That way even if you don’t have enough time to write a full comment on how you want your scans or you get wrapped up in the inevitable difficulty of verbalizing visual stuff you can still take 10 seconds to tick boxes for COLOR , BRIGHTNESS and CONTRAST.

 

Needless to say these are your preferences, but the film stock used, the way it was been exposed and the quality of the light will condition immensely how closely we can match your expectations. E.g. Let’s just say we won’t be able to turn a Fuji Superia 200 shot on a cloudy day with evaluative metering (and thus underexposed 1-2 stops) into a grainless, airy, pastel, low contrasty warm-toned piece of photographic candy.

 

SO, that being said. From now on you’ll be able to choose your preferences for:

 

COLOR We all have different color tastes; help us understand yours in order to get you your dream tones!

CONTRAST Contrast is key to the final look of your images. Ask for as much (or as few) as you want!

BRIGHTNESS Do you like dark moody stuff or super airy pastel work? Let us know!

THAT’S IT! AS EASY AS THAT! We’ll take it from there and follow your guidelines as closely as humanly possible throughout the scanning and editing process.

Next thing you know: BAAAM! Scans in your inbox just the way you wanted them.

 

Hope you enjoy the new Order Form and now get out there and shoot some film!

 

 

Carmencita Crew Member Feature: Laura Leal

So again it’s time for us to show you guys one of our crew members’ work.
As you may know at the lab we’re all photographers. We’re all obsessed with perfect film tones and are big camera nerds. So we knbow where you’re coming from!

Laura Leal has been one of the latest additions to the lab’s crew. She started her “relationship” with Carmencita as a customer. She, like so many of us, had spent years scanning her own stuff on flatbed home scanners and felt really relieved to finally get great looking scans straight into her inbox. Of course as the lab grew bigger and bigger (and she being friends with a few of us for a while) we felt hiring her was the perfect choice!

Her work is primarily shot on Contax 645 and she switches from Portra to Fuji 400H whenever she feels tone-wise she needs one or the other.
Today we show you the stuff she’s better known for, that is great fashion editorials, soulfull female portraits and model test shots.

So yeah, next time you receive your scans and a loving feedback text you can be like “oh my f*cking God, this Laura is that 24 year-old girl they featured a while ago who shot those amazing photos of girls!” 😛

Hope you love them as much as we do!

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“To Push” or “Not to Push” That is the question!

OK, so if you’ve made it this far it means you’ve been reading/hearing about this concept of “pushing” film for a while. You know it has something to do with “stops” but sometimes it feels confusing because you see all sorts of amazing pictures with stuff like “Fuji 400H shot @ 100” or “overexposed two stops” and then you see “TriX 400 shot and developed @ 1600” and it all just starts to sound closer to mathematics than photography. Confused? Then read on:

We call “Pushing Film” when we chemically increase the film’s exposure during the development process. There might be a couple reasons to do so. For example, let’s say you’ve only got Kodak Portra 400 loaded on your camera while you’re at a wedding, and you enter the church for the ceremony. You take a meter reading and for 400 ISO at apperture f2 the meter says you should shoot at 1/15 speed. Panic arises the moment you associate that shutter speed with blurry pictures either due to camera shake (hello shaky hands!) or the subject’s movement. Here’s one situation when PUSHING FILM would be quite useful. Imagine you had 1600 ISO speed loaded on your camera… That’d be cool.. those 2 extra steps would make such a difference… the meter reading would now say “1600 ISO at f2 1/60 speed”, and you know you’ve taken some decent shots at 1/60. OK, so no need to imagine that 1600 ISO roll, just shoot the Kodak Portra 400 like it’s 1600 ISO and ask the lab to push that roll 2 steps. Needless to say you should mark that on the roll somehow so that it won’t get mixed up with all those Portra 400 you shot before the ceremony at their regular 400 ISO.

So when your lovely package arrives to Carmencita HQ’s (along with those wonderful chocolate bars!) we’ll take that Kodak Portra 400 roll with the handwriten “Push to 1600” note and let it develop longer than the “unlabeled” Portra 400. That way you’re happy with your perfectly-exposed/non-blury church shots, your client is happy with their pictures and we’re happy we made your day! (again, thanks for the chocolate bars!)

THE WHOLE PUSHING/PULLING/OVEREXPOSING/UNDEREXPOSING/ISO RATING MISUNDERSTANDING

So, as some of you might have realised, you are essentially UNDER-EXPOSING your Portra 400 by two stops by making it an “imaginary 1600 roll” and asking

Is try the? A allegra 30 mg tablets applications much nipples Well trazodone without a prescription heart into is lotion.

us to chemically compensate for that..

Here is where the confusion might kick in, right? “Underexpose? I heard that’s bad… I usually overexpose.. But isn’t that done in-camera? At what ISO should I rate my film? Will this expired film be OK? Should I buy more chocolate for the awesome guys at Carmencita?”

Here’s the thing. Pushing is done chemically by the lab. Overexposing (or underexposing) whether it be by changing your ISO (rating film at different ISO than box speed) or not is done in-camera by the photographer. For example; we all know that color negative film looks great when overexposed. So you could meter your subject’s shadow and let’s say the meter says “1/1000 at f2” for your Portra 160: so if you wanted those creamier skin tones with more detail on the shadows you’d overexpose a stop and shoot that at “1/500 f2”. Needles to say you would have gotten the same results by “rating” the film at ISO 80 in your lightmeter and shooting exactly what the meter told you (hint: 1/500 at f2!)

JENNI1

Kodak Ektar 100 shot and pushed to 400. Photos by Nico Jenni

CONSIDERATIONS WHEN THINKING ABOUT PUSHING FILM

So all that being said: why push film? Our church example is a very obvious reason. With the very few high-ISO film stocks we currently have it’s great knowing there’s an alternative and no reason to be intimidated by low-light situations.

However it must be noted that pushing film has it’s “side effects”, most notably an increase in contrast/grain and general detail loss in the shadows. Some films lend themselves better to pushing; like most black and white films and the Fuji Provia 400 slide film. Pushed color negative film results vary a lot. In our experience Kodak Portra for a well-lit scene handles pushing pretty well. If the the light source is not that great (like distant tungsten lamp posts mixed with hallogen lights) the colors can get a little funky, but hey, sometimes you just don’t get to decide what light you shot in! 😉

WHAT ABOUT PULLING?

DipticoPULL

Ilford Delta 3200 shot and pulled to 800. Photos by Buenaventura Marco

We call pulling when, let’s say you only have Ilford 3200 ISO film and you’re shooting a family session at bright daylight ( #truestory). Your camera only goes to 1/1000 speed and you’d hate to shoot the whole thing at f16… So you can shoot the roll like it’s 800 ISO and the ask the lab to PULL. That would mean we would develop that particular roll for less time, exactly the time needed for 2 stops less than the actual 3200 ISO that would be the “box speed”.

NOTE: Pulling is less common since it’s really not that frequent to have a higher ISO film than you wished for AND color negative film looks really great overexposed, so even if you shot a Portra 800 at noon and overexposed it like 4 stops it would probably still look great. Yes, film is awesome in case you were wondering!

OK, off to eat a couple more chocolate bars before lunch brake…

“To Push” or “Not to Push” That is the question!

OK, so if you’ve made it this far it means you’ve been reading/hearing about this concept of “pushing” film for a while. You know it has something to do with “stops” but sometimes it feels confusing because you see all sorts of amazing pictures with stuff like “Fuji 400H shot @ 100” or “overexposed two stops” and then you see “TriX 400 shot and developed @ 1600” and it all just starts to sound closer to mathematics than photography. Confused? Then read on:

We call “Pushing Film” when we chemically increase the film’s exposure during the development process. There might be a couple reasons to do so. For example, let’s say you’ve only got Kodak Portra 400 loaded on your camera while you’re at a wedding, and you enter the church for the ceremony. You take a meter reading and for 400 ISO at apperture f2 the meter says you should shoot at 1/15 speed. Panic arises the moment you associate that shutter speed with blurry pictures either due to camera shake (hello shaky hands!) or the subject’s movement. Here’s one situation when PUSHING FILM would be quite useful. Imagine you had 1600 ISO speed loaded on your camera… That’d be cool.. those 2 extra stops would make such a difference… the meter reading would now say “1600 ISO at f2 1/60 speed”, and you know you’ve taken some decent shots at 1/60. OK, so no need to imagine that 1600 ISO roll, just shoot the Kodak Portra 400 like it’s 1600 ISO and ask the lab to push that roll 2 stops. Needless to say you should mark that on the roll somehow so that it won’t get mixed up with all those Portra 400 you shot before the ceremony at their regular 400 ISO.

So when your lovely package arrives to Carmencita HQ’s (along with those wonderful chocolate bars!) we’ll take that Kodak Portra 400 roll with the handwriten “Push to 1600” note and let it develop longer than the “unlabeled” Portra 400. That way you’re happy with your perfectly-exposed/non-blury church shots, your client is happy with their pictures and we’re happy we made your day! (again, thanks for the chocolate bars!)

THE WHOLE PUSHING/PULLING/OVEREXPOSING/UNDEREXPOSING/ISO RATING MISUNDERSTANDING

So, as some of you might have realised, you are essentially UNDER-EXPOSING your Portra 400 by two stops by making it an “imaginary 1600 roll” and asking

Is try the? A allegra 30 mg tablets applications much nipples Well trazodone without a prescription heart into is lotion.

us to chemically compensate for that..

Here is where the confusion might kick in, right? “Underexpose? I heard that’s bad… I usually overexpose.. But isn’t that done in-camera? At what ISO should I rate my film? Will this expired film be OK? Should I buy more chocolate for the awesome guys at Carmencita?”

Here’s the thing. Pushing is done chemically by the lab. Overexposing (or underexposing) whether it be by changing your ISO (rating film at different ISO than box speed) or not is done in-camera by the photographer. For example; we all know that color negative film looks great when overexposed. So you could meter your subject’s shadow and let’s say the meter says “1/1000 at f2” for your Portra 160: so if you wanted those creamier skin tones with more detail on the shadows you’d overexpose a stop and shoot that at “1/500 f2”. Needless to say you would have gotten the same results by “rating” the film at ISO 80 in your lightmeter and shooting exactly what the meter told you (hint: 1/500 at f2!)

JENNI1

Kodak Ektar 100 shot and pushed to 400. Photos by Nico Jenni

CONSIDERATIONS WHEN THINKING ABOUT PUSHING FILM

So all that being said: why push film? Our church example is a very obvious reason. With the very few high-ISO film stocks we currently have it’s great knowing there’s an alternative and no reason to be intimidated by low-light situations.

However it must be noted that pushing film has it’s “side effects”, most notably an increase in contrast/grain and general detail loss in the shadows. Some films lend themselves better to pushing; like most black and white films and the Fuji Provia 400 slide film. Pushed color negative film results vary a lot. In our experience Kodak Portra for a well-lit scene handles pushing pretty well. If the the light source is not that great (like distant tungsten lamp posts mixed with hallogen lights) the colors can get a little funky, but hey, sometimes you just don’t get to decide what light you shot in! 😉

WHAT ABOUT PULLING?

DipticoPULL

Ilford Delta 3200 shot and pulled to 800. Photos by Buenaventura Marco

We call pulling when, let’s say you only have Ilford 3200 ISO film and you’re shooting a family session at bright daylight ( #truestory). Your camera only goes to 1/1000 speed and you’d hate to shoot the whole thing at f16… So you can shoot the roll like it’s 800 ISO and the ask the lab to PULL. That would mean we would develop that particular roll for less time, exactly the time needed for 2 stops less than the actual 3200 ISO that would be the “box speed”.

NOTE: Pulling is less common since it’s really not that frequent to have a higher ISO film than you wished for AND color negative film looks really great overexposed, so even if you shot a Portra 800 at noon and overexposed it like 4 stops it would probably still look great. Yes, film is awesome in case you were wondering!

OK, off to eat a couple more chocolate bars before lunch break…

NEW: Slide Film (E6) Processing and Scanning Services

So we gave a few hints on Twitter and privately to some customers by email, but we’re happy to announce that we finally offer SLIDE FILM ( E6 ) processing and scanning. You guys can finally shoot your Velvia 50, Provia 400X and Astia or even that Agfa CT Precisa you were saving ‘cause you didn’t feel like cross-processing it. We’re charging the same as we do for Black & White processing and as with BW you just need to add 2 business days to the regular C41 delivery time. We had the privilege of having client/friend Jan Scholz “micmojo” beta-test this process for us. He was super excited to finally be able to shoot those wonderful slide stocks and took some Fuji Velvia 50 with him in his recent vacations in Florida.

We loved the results and felt like it could be a great way to introduce this new “product” to Carmencita customers. Being so used to C41 film it’s refreshing to see a positive, with it’s “correct” white balance and contrast/saturation rendition depending on the film stock. Guys, be prepared to spot meter like freaking masters! As you probably already know slide film is NOT as forgiving as color (C41 ) film (hello Portra 400 5 overexposure – 2 underexposure? ). It’s latitude is quite reduced, like 1 over – 1 under, almost remix¡nascent of some digital cameras. Be prepared to use the “Sunny-16 Rule”, spot meter and having to choose between blown skies or correctly lit subjects. But hey, they don’t call it hard work for nothin’! 😛 WELCOME OUR SLIDE FILM PROCESSING AND SCANNING SERVICES! janScholzE6-2 janScholzE6-3 janScholzE6-4 janScholzE6-5 janScholzE6-6 janScholzE6-7